Economic Analysis

Many developing countries have several competing SPS capacity building needs linked to domestic policy objectives and agri-food export promotion. Resources available from national budgets and donors are usually insufficient to meet all the identified needs and inevitably priorities need to be established. Governments in some developed and developing countries have used economic analysis methodologies (e.g. cost-benefit analysis, cost-effectiveness analysis) to analyse the costs and benefits of particular investments aimed at enhancing domestic food safety, as well as animal and plant health. The experiences have generally pointed to significant savings and/or returns on investment, providing compelling evidence to help convince national treasuries and donors of the importance and value of investing in SPS capacity building.

STDF work on this topic, initiated in 2009, documents experiences and lessons learned related to the use of economic analysis methodologies to inform SPS decision-making.

Video 

STDF Briefing Note on the Use of Economic Analysis to Inform SPS Decision-making

See the STDF Briefing Note No. 3 on the Use of Economic Analysis to Inform SPS decision-making.

Guidance document on the use of economic analysis to inform SPS decision making

The STDF commissioned a Guidance document on the use of economic analysis to inform SPS decision making. This document reviews experiences with the use of economic analysis to guide priority-setting for SPS capacity building in developing countries, highlights the challenges faced in using such methods and provides general guidance to decision-makers on which economic analysis approaches are best applied in particular decision scenarios. 

STDF Workshop on the use of economic analysis to inform SPS decision-making - October 2009

 

The STDF organized a workshop in Geneva in October 2009 to raise awareness about how economic analysis can be used to inform SPS decision-making. Speakers representing developing and developed countries, as well as international organizations, provided examples of how different methodologies have been used to estimate the costs, benefits and returns on investments in food safety, animal and plant health capacity building (ex ante and ex post). The workshop was attended by delegates of the SPS Committee, as well as some 60 experts in food safety, animal and plant health.
Click here to see the programme and the presentations delivered.